Steven Moffat on Writer’s Block


steven_moffat_to_receive_special_honour_at_bafta_tv_awards

Whether you think that Steven Moffat is the best writer ever or that he’s is spoiling Doctor Who and Sherlock at the same time, you’ve gotta admit that the guy is a genius. I was watching a little interview on BBC Writersroom the other day, and he said something about writer’s block that really struck a chord with me:

“Writer’s block – embrace it, know it. It is your internal editor. It is telling you that you haven’t got it right yet, that you can write what you want to write, or the scene that you’re going to write, or the chapter you’re going to write – one reason, it’s not *right* yet. So listen to that voice and sit in agony until it all blossoms in your head. It’s not a fault, it’s just that you haven’t got it yet.”

Watch the interview here.

 

(First world) Bookworm Problems


Creative Writing with the Crimson League

  1. 1207951_woman_reading_at_homeRead something completely new? Reread something awesome? Read the next book in that series you started and are loving? This leads to:
  2. You sometimes read so many books at once that you forget what’s happening or where you are in some of them.
  3. The multiple books you are reading all jumble together in a weird dream where you and Harry Potter are hanging out with Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennett but then you all have to fight to the death in the Hunger Games. Harry dies first because he won’t use his wand to do anything but disarm people. You escape on a raft down the Mississippi with Huck Finn….
  4. I just got to the BEST PART of this novel and…. Oh yeah, that work place. I guess I’d better go to there. Le sigh.
  5. Why, favorite book? Why did you take a suicide dive off my bookshelf? Now your…

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Suppressing Talents: something between an open letter & a rant


There’s this TED Talk by Ken Robinson about how schools are destroying creativity. I agree with him strongly. Our educational institutions are thoroughly career-oriented because most people are under the impression that getting a job and earning a lot of money are the two main purposes of life. Sure, they’re important, but by no means are they the most important goals you have to achieve in life. We’re being forced to use just the left side of our brain when it comes to education, and our creativity, passion and imagination are being suppressed. Anywhere you go, you’ll find the arts down at the bottom of the subject hierarchy, far below languages, maths, the sciences and the humanities. Why? Because dance won’t get you anywhere. Because algebra is more important that singing. Because drama is just a pastime and cannot be considered as a real subject. Because painting does not make you the CEO of a large company.

This is a subject I feel very strongly about but a recent meeting with a doctor, who was a total stranger to me, made me feel compelled to write the following:

OPEN LETTER TO A DOCTOR I MET A FEW MONTHS AGO-

Dear Mr. My-Father’s-Incredibly-Smart-Colleague,

You asked me what I’m planning for my future, and I told you I wanted to have a future of full-time writing.

You, a total stranger, then proceeded to give me a long lecture about how writing is just a hobby and it won’t get me anywhere. You had the nerve to compare me with a relative of yours who used to want to be a flight attendant and ended up studying microbiology or genetic engineering or something, which I respect but, I am not her.

Continue reading “Suppressing Talents: something between an open letter & a rant”

My Journey


I originally posted this on APT 18 and the Feedback Page. I just felt like posting it on YSBU too 🙂

I’ve been on Storybird for over two years now, and it’s home. It’s family. It’s life, to be honest.
On October 27 2012 (my birthday), I was flipping through a children’s magazine, b0red. In the website reviews section, something caught my eye:

storybird.com

I decided to visit it, even though most websites they reviewed were too childish for me. I typed in the URL and pressed Enter, and I was taken to another world. Storybird was very different then from what it is now: there were no mentions, reposts, notifications, longform books, poetry, or anything of the sort. The layout was totally different from what it is now. Still, I found the website intriguing and made an account on it with the username, NancyBlake – a pseudonym I liked to use often.
And then, I started to read.
Continue reading “My Journey”

We Storybirders are so cool; we’re fighting the Potato Apocalypse!


I just reread @firstredhead’s Fighting the Potato Apocalype, and I HAD to write a blog post on YSBU after my line in Chapter 4:

Cherry’s mouth gaped open in awe as she viewed the approaching army dig and push beneath the earth.
“I know this is a really bad time,” she said, not removing her gaze. “But this is so going on the blog.”

In case you didn’t know, APTers (a term we use for members of A Pointless Task) are obsessed with potatoes, for some reason. FtPA is this super-potatorific longform book which has a star-studded cast of characters which consists of various Storybirders (not all could be mentioned in this blog post, unfortunately). The plot is face-paced, intriguing and just – amazing. Even if you don’t know those Storybirders, it’s a great read. Now, onto the post:

Click the above image to start reading FtPA by firstredhead on Storybird

Continue reading “We Storybirders are so cool; we’re fighting the Potato Apocalypse!”

2014 in review


The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for YSBU. A big thank you to the people who made this year awesome: our active administrators, our wonderful viewers and of course, potatoes. Well, I guess potatoes don’t count as people but… who cares?

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,700 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 5 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.